Yale Peabody Museum to open David Friend Hall

September 19, 2016

The Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History, one of the world’s preeminent natural history museums, will open David Friend Hall, a state-of-the-art gem and mineral gallery, on Oct. 23, 2016 in celebration of the museum’s 150th anniversary. The year-long construction project was funded by a $4 million gift from Yale alumnus and Carbonite founder and executive chair David Friend ’69. The gift funded the construction of the 2,300-square-foot gallery as well as an endowment for future displays and public programs. A ribbon-cutting ceremony will be held on Oct. 13, 2016. 

Read the full press release (pdf)

Update, Oct. 13, 2016: David Friend Hall will feature a selection of world-class gems from private collections including the  77-carat “Yellow Rose” diamond, one of the world’s rarest gemstones, and the 75-carat “Blue Dragon” sapphire, one of the finest specimens of its kind ever to go on public exhibition. This temporary presentation aims to enhance the richness and variety of the display of the more than 150 premier mineral specimens on view as part of the inaugural installation of David Friend Hall.  See below for high-res images of the Yellow Rose and Blue Dragon, as well as other  gems on display. 

Read the press release (pdf)

images

Installation Shot

David Friend Hall represents a new approach to exhibit design at the Peabody Museum  — one that uses a minimal amount of signage and invites visitors to ponder the pieces on display, much as they would a painting hanging in an art museum. (Photo by Michael Marlsand, courtesy of Yale University)

Blue Dragon

This sandstone concretion from Fontainebleau, France is among several large-scale specimens on display. (Photo by Michael Marsland, courtesy of Yale University)

Installation Shot

An amethyst specimen with calcite from Uruguay is among the exhibit’s highlights. It is from the collection of David Friend. (Photo by Michael Marlsand, courtesy of Yale University)

stibnite

A stibnite from the collection of James Zigras. (Photo by Michael Marsland, courtesy of Yale University)

Opal Earrings

Cabochon black opal earrings in 22-karat gold. From the Cora Miller Collection. (Photo by Harold Moritz, courtesy of Yale Peabody Museum)

Platinum and Golconda Diamond Ring

A 9.07-carat diamond in platinum ring; the diamond comes from the legendary Golconda Mines of India. From the Cora Miller Collection. (Photo by Harold Moritz, courtesy of Yale Peabody Museum)

Platinum, Colombian Emerald and Diamond Ring

A 4.15-carat emerald in platinum ring. From the Cora Miller Collection. (Photo by Harold Moritz, courtesy of Yale Peabody Museum)

Platinum, Gold, Winza (Tanzania) Ruby and Diamond Ring

A 6.07-carat ruby in platinum and 18-karat gold ring, flanked by two triangular diamonds, approximately 1.50 carats. From the Cora Miller Collection. (Photo by Harold Moritz, courtesy of Yale Peabody Museum)

Platinum, Sri Lanka Sapphire and Diamond Ring

A 10.08-carat sapphire in platinum ring, flanked by 10 pear-shaped and 16 round diamonds, approximately 2.43 carats. From the Cora Miller Collection. (Photo by Harold Moritz, courtesy of Yale Peabody Museum)

Vivid Yellow South African Diamond and Diamond Ring

7.05-carat yellow diamond in a platinum and 18-karat gold, flanked by two trapezoid-shaped diamonds, approximately 1.32 carats. From the Cora Miller Collection. (Photo by Harold Moritz, courtesy of Yale Peabody Museum)

Opal Earrings

These earrings feature four opals accented by garnets and diamonds. From the Cora Miller Collection. (Photo by Harold Moritz, courtesy of Yale Peabody Museum)

Cullinan Blue Diamond

The Cullinan Blue Diamond Necklace is made of 9-karat rose-gold with silver top and set with 243 round colorless diamonds and nine rare blue diamonds, the largest of which is 2.6 carats. On loan from the Smithsonian Institution. (Photo by Chip Clark, courtesy of Smithsonian Institution)

Namibian Quartz

This 2,000-pound quartz crystal from Namibia will greet visitors to David Friend Hall. It will not be displayed behind glass. (Photo by Robert Lorenz, courtesy of Yale Peabody Museum

Namibian Quartz

David Friend ‘69 stands beside the 2,000-pound quartz crystal from Namibia that greets visitors to David Friend Hall. The photo was taken during a ribbon-cutting ceremony held on Oct. 13, 2016. (Photo by Michael Marsland, courtesy of Yale University)

Chalcedony

A quartz specimen of the chalcedony variety. A gift of C.R. Beesley. (Photo by Michael Marsland, courtesy of Yale University)

Aragonite

An aragonite specimen from Yunnan Province, China. (Photo by Michael Marsland, courtesy of Yale University)

Chalcedony

This 3,300-pound lime-green fluorite with quartz measures 5 feet by 4 feet. (Photo by Robert Lorenz, courtesy of Yale Peabody Museum)

Aragonite

This 3,300-pound lime-green fluorite with quartz measures 5 feet by 4 feet. (Photo by Robert Lorenz, courtesy of Yale Peabody Museum)

Aragonite

An aragonite specimen from Yunnan Province, China. (Photo by Robert Lorenz, courtesy of Yale Peabody Museum)

Gypsum

A gypsum specimen of the desert rose variety from the Chihuahua Desert, Mexico. (Photo by Robert Lorenz, courtesy of Yale Peabody Museum)

Quartz

A quartz specimen from the Collier Creek Mine in Arkansas. (Photo by Michael Marsland, courtesy of Yale University)

Aragonite

An aragonite specimen of the flos ferri variety from Yunnan Province, China. (Photo by Robert Lorenz, courtesy of Yale Peabody Museum)

Concretion

This 30 million-year-old sandstone concretion from Fontainebleau, France has never been on display in public. It is from the collection of David Friend. (Photo by Robert Lorenz, courtesy of Yale Peabody Museum)

Amethyst

An amethyst specimen with calcite from Uruguay. It is from the collection of David Friend. (Photo by Robert Lorenz, courtesy of Yale Peabody Museum)

Agate

An agate specimen from Brazil. It is from the collection of Cap and Joan Beesley. (Photo by Robert Lorenz, courtesy of Yale Peabody Museum)

Stibnite

A stibnite from the collection of James Zigras. (Photo by Robert Lorenz, courtesy of Yale Peabody Museum)

Tanzanite

Rhodochrosite, Sweet Home Mine, Colorado, United States. On loan from the collection of Jim and Gail Spann. (Photo by Michael Marsland, courtesy of Yale University)

Aquamarine

Pyromorphite, Daoping Mine, Guangxi Zhuang A.R., China. On loan from the collection of Dr. Robert Lavinsky. (Photo by Michael Marsland, courtesy of Yale University)

Calcite

A calcite crystal on fluorite with sphalerite from the collection of Mark J. Pospisil, curator at the Perot Museum of Nature and Science in Dallas. (Photo by Joe Budd, courtesy of Yale Peabody Musuem)

Calcite

A calcite crystal with marcasite and galena from the collection of Mark J. Pospisil, curator at the Perot Museum of Nature and Science in Dallas. (Photo by Joe Budd, courtesy of Yale Peabody Museum)

Tanzanite

This two-pound tanzanite crystal from the collection of Dr. Robert Lavinsky is among the world’s largest specimens of its kind. (Photo by Joe Budd, courtesy of Yale Peabody Museum)

Aquamarine

An aquamarine crystal from the collection of Eugene and Rosalind Meieran. (Photo by Jeff Scovil, courtesy of Yale Peabody Museum)

Aquamarine

An aquamarine crystal with albite from the collection of Mark J. Pospisil, curator at the Perot Museum of Nature and Science in Dallas. (Photo by Joe Budd, courtesy of Yale Peabody Museum)

Akunzite

A kunzite crystal from the collection of Jim and Gail Spann. (Photo by Thomas Spann, courtesy of Yale Peabody Museum)